Harlesden Town Garden

Gardening Tips & Advice

Month-by-month gardening tips and advice for gardeners and raised bed holders

A wheelbarrow filled with garden waste
  • January
  • January is typically the coldest month of the year in the UK, but the days start to get longer again. Catch the winter, get some fresh air and get busy in the garden. There’s lots to do!

    1. Prune Apple and Pear trees (but not those grown against walls).
    2. Get your pots and greenhouses ready for spring.
    3. Recycle your Christmas tree.
    4. Plan your vegetable crop rotations for next season.
    5. Winter can be hard for birds, so don’t forget to put some food and water out for them.
    6. Check your stored tubers for any drying out or rot.


    Time to harvest:

    Leeks and Kale

    LeekKale

  • February
  • February brings murmurs of springtime.

    1. Prepare your vegetable seed beds, and sow under covers to maintain a constant supply of healthy veg throughout the year.
    2. If you’re going to be planting potatoes, make sure you let your seed potatoes ‘chit’.
    3. Protect your soft fruit blossoms from frost and hungry wildlife.


    Time to harvest:

    Leeks and Kale

    LeekKale

  • March
  • March means it’s time to spring into action in time with the Spring season! Longer, warmer days mean more time to get outside and garden.

    1. Prune rose bushes and climbing roses.
    2. Plant shallots, onions and early potatoes.
    3. Sow fast-growing radishes and lettuce seeds.
    4. Start off pea shoots and broad beans indoors.
    5. Plant summer bulbs in pots.
    6. Lift and divide overgrown perennials.
    7. Mulch weeds to get them under control early.
    8. Protect new shoots from slugs.

     

    Time to harvest:

    n/a

  • April
  • April usually brings both rain and shine, but the daffodils and blooming trees brighten any grey day.

    1. Sow hardy vegetable seeds directly into the ground.
    2. Transplant your broad beans after a short hardening-off period.
    3. Protect new leaves on your potato plants with cardboard or fleece if frost is forecasted.
    4. Thin out your lettuce seedlings, and protect them from slugs and snails.
    5. Start off leeks for next winter’s harvest indoors.
    6. Keep weeds under control.
    7. Tie in climbing and rambling roses.
    8. Give shrubs, roses and citrus trees some extra feed.
    9. Prune Fig trees.

     

    Time to harvest:

    Radishes

    Radishes

  • May
  • May brings promises of summer. Nature is buzzing with life as insects and wildlife and more flowers are starting to bloom.

    1. Protect young shoots from late frost (keep an eye on the weather forecast.)
    2. Earth up potatoes and plant any remaining.
    3. Stay on top of weed control.
    4. Ventilate the greenhouse on warm days.
    5. Check for nesting birds and other wildlife before clipping hedges.
    6. Water in the early mornings and late evenings with rain water and recycled water. 
    7. Start off Swiss Chard or Perpetual Spinach, directly in the ground.
    8. Transplant runner beans and build a tall structure for them to grow up.
    9. Don’t forget to plant more radishes for a continual crop.
    10. Let your lawn grow and scatter some wildflower bombs, ready for a summer blooming.


    Time to harvest:

    Lettuce and radishes

    LettuceRadishes

  • June
  • Summer has arrived! That means longer, warmer (hopefully) days and with that comes nature bursting into life. Plants will become thirstier in the summer months, so it’s important to be water-wise, and keep an eye out for pests.

    1. Plant out summer bedding.
    2. Stay on top of the weeding.
    3. Pinch out side shoots on your tomatoes.
    4. Give tall, floppy plants support using stakes.
    5. Prune spring flowering shrubs.
    6. Plant beetroot seeds directly into the soil.
    7. Harden off and transplant leeks and dwarf french beans.

     

    Time to harvest:

    Lettuce, salads, radishes, and new potatoes.

    LettuceRadishes Potatoes

  • July
  • The fruits of your (gardening) labour are starting to ripen. Long, hot days mean more time in the garden. Remember to protect your skin if you are outside during the hours of 10 am – 3 pm!

    1. Deadhead bedding plants and repeat-flowering perennials to keep them flowering longer.
    2. Pick summer fruits such as apricots and peaches.
    3. Keep an eye out for slugs.
    4. Sow fast-growing turnips and more radish seeds directly into the soil.
    5. Thin out turnip and beetroot seedlings.
    6. Stake-off beans that might need extra support.

    Time to harvest:

    Swiss chard (outside leaves), broad beans and courgettes (before they turn into marrows).

    Swiss ChardBeansCourgette with a flower

     

  • August
  • August is the hottest month, but the days are starting to become shorter. Gardens and raised beds will require more water. It’s always best to water early in the morning or late evening, and if possible, use grey water or rainwater stored in the water butt.

    1. Deadhead flowering plants.
    2. Collect seeds from any plants that have started going to seed.
    3.  Lift and pot rooted strawberry runners.
    4. Harvest raspberries and cut old fruit canes.
    5. Sow carrot seeds directly into the soil.
    6. Transplant winter lettuce into raised beds.
    7. Check leaves for caterpillars.
    8. Remove any spent crops.

    Time to harvest:

    Swiss chard, peas, runner beans, sweet corn, salad leaves, radishes and any other veg that’s ready to enjoy.

    Peas in podsSweet cornSwiss ChardBeans Tomatoes

  • September
  • As the days shorten and the temperature cools, September is an opportunity to take advantage of harvest rewards from your fruit or vegetable patch. It’s also a reminder that it’s time to begin planting spring-flowering bulbs for next year as well as collecting seeds. Take advantage of the remaining warmth while you still can!

    1. Divide herbaceous perennials.

    2. Dig up any remaining potatoes before they become slug food.
    3. Collect and sow seeds from hardy and perennial plants.
    4. Enjoy autumn raspberries.
    5. Protect leafy veg crops from birds.
    6. Clean out and prepare the greenhouse for autumn use.
    7.  Plant spring flowering bulbs.
    8. Sow spinach and mustard seeds directly into the soil.
    9. Add stakes to support kale and broccoli plants.
    10. Turn the compost

     

    Time to harvest:

    Winter lettuces (outer leaves), Beetroots, Turnips, beans and peas.

    alt=""

    Peas in pods

    Beans

  • October
  • October means autumn has arrived. Days are cooler and starting to get shorter, and the leaves begin to change colour and begin to fall.

    1.  Cut back perennials that have died down.
    2. Divide herbaceous perennials.
    3. Plant out spring cabbages.
    4. Collect the last of the seeds to grow next year.
    5. Plant garlic cloves for a mid-summer harvest.
    6. Weed leeks
    7. Set slug traps.
    8. Turn the compost.
    9. Rake fallen leaves to make leaf mould.

     

    Time to harvest:

    Spinach and mustard leaves (outer leaves), Kale and Swiss Chard.

    alt=""

    alt=""

    alt=""

  • November
  • As November arrives, so does winter. With leaves falling and harsh weather conditions on the horizon, it’s important to take steps to protect your plants from the elements. If you have a greenhouse, move delicate plants inside. If not, try finding a sheltered spot for them or wrapping them in fabric for insulation. Don’t forget about our feathered friends this season- make sure birdbaths are filled with fresh water, and there is plenty of food available for them to eat.

    1. Plant tulip bulbs for next spring.
    2. Prune roses.
    3. Plant out winter bedding.
    4. Put out bird food for winter birds and to encourage biodiversity.
    5. Protect crops from winter birds.
    6. Apply mulch to protect and enrich the soil in your raised bed. 
    7. Compost all plant waste.
    8. Continue to collect fallen leaves for leaf mould.
    9. Mulch raised beds.

     

    Time to harvest:

    Carrots, Kale, Spinach and Swiss Chard.

    alt=""alt="" alt=""

    alt=""

     

  • December
  • Winter has undoubtedly arrived, and the shortest day of the year is on the horizon. Winter brings frost, so make sure your plants are well protected.

    1. Plant and/or transplant trees.
    2. Prune acers, birches and vines before Christmas.
    3. Wash pots, seed trays and tools ready for the spring.
    4. Keep leafy veg protected from hungry birds.
    5. Make sure that your winter protection structures are still in place and secure.
    6. Insulate your greenhouse if you have one.

     

    Time to harvest:

    Leeks, parsnips, winter cabbage, sprouts and other root crops.

    alt=""

    alt=""alt=""

January is typically the coldest month of the year in the UK, but the days start to get longer again. Catch the winter, get some fresh air and get busy in the garden. There’s lots to do!

  1. Prune Apple and Pear trees (but not those grown against walls).
  2. Get your pots and greenhouses ready for spring.
  3. Recycle your Christmas tree.
  4. Plan your vegetable crop rotations for next season.
  5. Winter can be hard for birds, so don’t forget to put some food and water out for them.
  6. Check your stored tubers for any drying out or rot.


Time to harvest:

Leeks and Kale

LeekKale

February brings murmurs of springtime.

  1. Prepare your vegetable seed beds, and sow under covers to maintain a constant supply of healthy veg throughout the year.
  2. If you’re going to be planting potatoes, make sure you let your seed potatoes ‘chit’.
  3. Protect your soft fruit blossoms from frost and hungry wildlife.


Time to harvest:

Leeks and Kale

LeekKale

March means it’s time to spring into action in time with the Spring season! Longer, warmer days mean more time to get outside and garden.

  1. Prune rose bushes and climbing roses.
  2. Plant shallots, onions and early potatoes.
  3. Sow fast-growing radishes and lettuce seeds.
  4. Start off pea shoots and broad beans indoors.
  5. Plant summer bulbs in pots.
  6. Lift and divide overgrown perennials.
  7. Mulch weeds to get them under control early.
  8. Protect new shoots from slugs.

 

Time to harvest:

n/a

April usually brings both rain and shine, but the daffodils and blooming trees brighten any grey day.

  1. Sow hardy vegetable seeds directly into the ground.
  2. Transplant your broad beans after a short hardening-off period.
  3. Protect new leaves on your potato plants with cardboard or fleece if frost is forecasted.
  4. Thin out your lettuce seedlings, and protect them from slugs and snails.
  5. Start off leeks for next winter’s harvest indoors.
  6. Keep weeds under control.
  7. Tie in climbing and rambling roses.
  8. Give shrubs, roses and citrus trees some extra feed.
  9. Prune Fig trees.

 

Time to harvest:

Radishes

Radishes

May brings promises of summer. Nature is buzzing with life as insects and wildlife and more flowers are starting to bloom.

  1. Protect young shoots from late frost (keep an eye on the weather forecast.)
  2. Earth up potatoes and plant any remaining.
  3. Stay on top of weed control.
  4. Ventilate the greenhouse on warm days.
  5. Check for nesting birds and other wildlife before clipping hedges.
  6. Water in the early mornings and late evenings with rain water and recycled water. 
  7. Start off Swiss Chard or Perpetual Spinach, directly in the ground.
  8. Transplant runner beans and build a tall structure for them to grow up.
  9. Don’t forget to plant more radishes for a continual crop.
  10. Let your lawn grow and scatter some wildflower bombs, ready for a summer blooming.


Time to harvest:

Lettuce and radishes

LettuceRadishes

Summer has arrived! That means longer, warmer (hopefully) days and with that comes nature bursting into life. Plants will become thirstier in the summer months, so it’s important to be water-wise, and keep an eye out for pests.

  1. Plant out summer bedding.
  2. Stay on top of the weeding.
  3. Pinch out side shoots on your tomatoes.
  4. Give tall, floppy plants support using stakes.
  5. Prune spring flowering shrubs.
  6. Plant beetroot seeds directly into the soil.
  7. Harden off and transplant leeks and dwarf french beans.

 

Time to harvest:

Lettuce, salads, radishes, and new potatoes.

LettuceRadishes Potatoes

The fruits of your (gardening) labour are starting to ripen. Long, hot days mean more time in the garden. Remember to protect your skin if you are outside during the hours of 10 am – 3 pm!

  1. Deadhead bedding plants and repeat-flowering perennials to keep them flowering longer.
  2. Pick summer fruits such as apricots and peaches.
  3. Keep an eye out for slugs.
  4. Sow fast-growing turnips and more radish seeds directly into the soil.
  5. Thin out turnip and beetroot seedlings.
  6. Stake-off beans that might need extra support.

Time to harvest:

Swiss chard (outside leaves), broad beans and courgettes (before they turn into marrows).

Swiss ChardBeansCourgette with a flower

 

August is the hottest month, but the days are starting to become shorter. Gardens and raised beds will require more water. It’s always best to water early in the morning or late evening, and if possible, use grey water or rainwater stored in the water butt.

  1. Deadhead flowering plants.
  2. Collect seeds from any plants that have started going to seed.
  3.  Lift and pot rooted strawberry runners.
  4. Harvest raspberries and cut old fruit canes.
  5. Sow carrot seeds directly into the soil.
  6. Transplant winter lettuce into raised beds.
  7. Check leaves for caterpillars.
  8. Remove any spent crops.

Time to harvest:

Swiss chard, peas, runner beans, sweet corn, salad leaves, radishes and any other veg that’s ready to enjoy.

Peas in podsSweet cornSwiss ChardBeans Tomatoes

As the days shorten and the temperature cools, September is an opportunity to take advantage of harvest rewards from your fruit or vegetable patch. It’s also a reminder that it’s time to begin planting spring-flowering bulbs for next year as well as collecting seeds. Take advantage of the remaining warmth while you still can!

  1. Divide herbaceous perennials.

  2. Dig up any remaining potatoes before they become slug food.
  3. Collect and sow seeds from hardy and perennial plants.
  4. Enjoy autumn raspberries.
  5. Protect leafy veg crops from birds.
  6. Clean out and prepare the greenhouse for autumn use.
  7.  Plant spring flowering bulbs.
  8. Sow spinach and mustard seeds directly into the soil.
  9. Add stakes to support kale and broccoli plants.
  10. Turn the compost

 

Time to harvest:

Winter lettuces (outer leaves), Beetroots, Turnips, beans and peas.

alt=""

Peas in pods

Beans

October means autumn has arrived. Days are cooler and starting to get shorter, and the leaves begin to change colour and begin to fall.

  1.  Cut back perennials that have died down.
  2. Divide herbaceous perennials.
  3. Plant out spring cabbages.
  4. Collect the last of the seeds to grow next year.
  5. Plant garlic cloves for a mid-summer harvest.
  6. Weed leeks
  7. Set slug traps.
  8. Turn the compost.
  9. Rake fallen leaves to make leaf mould.

 

Time to harvest:

Spinach and mustard leaves (outer leaves), Kale and Swiss Chard.

alt=""

alt=""

alt=""

As November arrives, so does winter. With leaves falling and harsh weather conditions on the horizon, it’s important to take steps to protect your plants from the elements. If you have a greenhouse, move delicate plants inside. If not, try finding a sheltered spot for them or wrapping them in fabric for insulation. Don’t forget about our feathered friends this season- make sure birdbaths are filled with fresh water, and there is plenty of food available for them to eat.

  1. Plant tulip bulbs for next spring.
  2. Prune roses.
  3. Plant out winter bedding.
  4. Put out bird food for winter birds and to encourage biodiversity.
  5. Protect crops from winter birds.
  6. Apply mulch to protect and enrich the soil in your raised bed. 
  7. Compost all plant waste.
  8. Continue to collect fallen leaves for leaf mould.
  9. Mulch raised beds.

 

Time to harvest:

Carrots, Kale, Spinach and Swiss Chard.

alt=""alt="" alt=""

alt=""

 

Winter has undoubtedly arrived, and the shortest day of the year is on the horizon. Winter brings frost, so make sure your plants are well protected.

  1. Plant and/or transplant trees.
  2. Prune acers, birches and vines before Christmas.
  3. Wash pots, seed trays and tools ready for the spring.
  4. Keep leafy veg protected from hungry birds.
  5. Make sure that your winter protection structures are still in place and secure.
  6. Insulate your greenhouse if you have one.

 

Time to harvest:

Leeks, parsnips, winter cabbage, sprouts and other root crops.

alt=""

alt=""alt=""

Source: Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) and Veg in One Bed by Huw Richards.

Skip to content